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Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles

Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles


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If you would rather spend time shopping for gifts than groceries this holiday season, there are plenty of L.A. restaurants offering festive menus for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Here is a roundup of some restaurants that are open and serving delicious dishes:

Beverly Hills Hotel

Capture the spirit of the season at the iconic Beverly Hills Hotel with Christmas Eve prix fixe dinner ($140 per adult, $55 per child) from 5 to 10 p.m. to 3 p.m. Christmas dinner at the Polo Lounge ($140 per adult, $55 per child) will be served from 5 to 10 p.m. Menu highlights include Maine lobster medallion, stuffed quail, turkey roulade, roasted filet mignon, and a choice of buche de Noel or pain perdu. Santa Claus and carolers will also be in attendance.

Café Del Rey

The Westside’s Café Del Rey is offering a three-course prix fixe Christmas Day menu including crispy octopus, barramundi, braised short ribs, black truffle pasta, and eggnog crème brûlée. $60 per person.

Catch

Santa Monica’s Catch is offering a three-course prix fixe dinner Christmas Eve from 5 to 10 p.m. and Christmas Day from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. with dishes like lobster crudo with black truffle, filet mignon, house smoked salmon, turkey roulade, and a peppermint chocolate tart. $90 per person.

Delphine Eatery & Bar

Delphine Eatery & Bar will offer a four-course holiday-inspired prix fixe menu on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day that includes apple and fennel soup, Dungeness crab ravioli, grilled prime sirloin cap, and pan-roasted white bass. $67 per person.

Hotel Bel Air

Hotel Bel Air is offering a special holiday tea throughout December, a gingerbread house and cookie decorating class on December 18, and a Christmas Eve menu featuring tuna carpaccio, steamed stripped bass, lobster pot pie, smoked duck breast, venison filet, and a buche de Noel. There is also a Christmas Day brunch, and a Christmas dinner with menu options including hand cut tortellini, pan roasted turbot, quail, ribeye steak, and a dessert buffet.

Mr. C Beverly Hills

Mr. C Beverly Hills will be serving a four-course prix fixe dinner on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. The Cipriani Group restaurant’s menu will include a trio of marinated salmon, octopus, and tuna tartare, walnut crusted filet, and terrine semifreddo. $35 per person.

Patina

Joachim Splichal’s downtown Patina is offering a three-course ($65 per person), four-course ($85 per person), and eight-course ($150 per person) menu on Christmas Eve. Menu highlights include seared diver scallops, Japanese Kobe beef, and a buche de Noel. Served from 5 to 8:30 p.m.

WP24

Wolfgang Puck’s WP24 at the Ritz-Carlton Los Angeles will be serving a prix fixe dinner for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. The four-course menu includes wok-fried Brussels sprouts, Hong Kong-style steamed fish, grilled lamb chops, and roasted Peking duck. $70 per person.


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Where to Celebrate Christmas in Los Angeles - Recipes

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

A wonderful Mexican Christmas tradition, las posadas literally translates in English as "the inns" or "the lodgings".

It symbolizes the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph as they searched for shelter in Bethlehem before the birth of Jesus.

The nine-day celebration lasts from December 16 to Christmas Eve (Noche Buena or "Holy Night"),

The ritual most especially includes a colorful pageant of kids (the "pilgrims" or peregrinos) -- costumed as Joseph, Mary, angels, shepherds and the Three Wise Men -- who travel to a designated home where Las Posadas will be celebrated. Upon arrival, the hosts or "innkeepers" meet the procession at the door for an exchange of lyrics from the traditional Pidiendo Posada:

In the name of heaven,
I ask you for shelter
because my beloved wife
can continue no longer.

This is no inn,
continue on your way.
I am not about to open.
You may be a scoundrel.

The song goes on for several stanzas until Joseph and Mary are
finally recognized and allowed inside with everyone singing in unison:

Let us sing with joy,
all bearing in mind
that Jesus, Joseph and Mary
honor us by having come.

What follows is an explosion of merrymaking that includes Christmas party music, piñata bashing, sweet treats and fireworks!

On Christmas eve, Las Posadas culminates in all-out feasting at the Cena de Noche Buena when families gather for a traditional meal of romeritos (baked shrimp), bacalao (dried cod fish), roast turkey, Christmas salad, and mounds of sweet and sugary buñuelos.

Especially in northern Mexico - and in Mexican communities in Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona - the festivities may include a Christmas tree, lots of presents, or even a visit by Santa. However, Three Kings Day on January 6 remains a traditional day for gift exchanges in Central and Southern Mexico and throughout Latin America.


Each year, the public is invited to join the La Posadas procession in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


Las Posadas Around the World

In the Philippines, the posadas tradition begins on December 15 with a Misa de Gallo (midnight mass) every night for nine consecutive nights prior to Christmas eve.

Similarly, Puerto Rican Christmas celebrations usually begin December 10 - and last until the Three Kings Day (Día de los Reyes Magos) on January 6 - with impromptu Parranda (parties) hosted at different locations. Each night holiday revelers can look forward to generous helpings of Christmas coquito (a delicious variation of egg nog) and festive platters of pasteles (savory meat pastries).

In Nicaragua, La Gritería (The Shoutings), occurs on December 7 when friends and family parade in the streets to sing in praise of the Virgin Mary before visiting neighbors to share festive food, drink and gift exchanges.


Las Posadas on the Web

Around the Web, find out more about celebrating Las Posadas with lively descriptions of annual family customs complete with recipes & instructions for homemade holiday feasting .


Watch the video: 100: ΛΟΣ ΑΝΤΖΕΛΕΣ (June 2022).