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Books for Cooks: Around the Fire by Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton

Books for Cooks: Around the Fire by Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton


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Need to thaw out? Try Portland chefs Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton's inspired grilling recipes, particularly for vegetables, and slather their Black Gold, a basting sauce created by heating herbs and garlic in rendered animal fat, on everything. (Ten Speed Press, $35, Amazon)

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More Great Cookbooks:


Around the Fire: Recipes for Inspired Grilling and Seasonal Feasting from Ox Restaurant [A Cookbook] Kindle Edition

"One way we cooks show love is to feed and nourish people. Greg and Gabrielle's book is a true extension of this idea: it's about the passion that comes from cooking foods over fire, passion you can feel with each turn of the page. These recipes are approachable, yet bold with flavors that will sate you from deep within."
--Cortney Burns and Nick Balla, chefs and authors of Bar Tartine

This is the kind of food that expands our imagination of what can be cooked on the grill . It's a gorgeous book rarely has anyone captured the beauty of fire and food in the way photographer Evan Sung has. . Around the Fire takes the familiar, twists it a bit, and refreshes the whole category.
--Russ Parsons, Saveur

Every summer, grilling gets us out of our cold-weather cooking rut, and whether you're grinding morcilla sausage from scratch or simply firing up a steak for the first time, this cookbook will give your grilling new game.
- Epicurious

"Try Portland chefs Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton's inspired grilling recipes, particularly for vegetables, and slather their Black Gold, a basting sauce created by heating herbs and garlic in rendered animal fat, on everything."
- Cooking Light

Like the old teach a man to fish proverb, Around the Fire is designed to give you the tools to prepare an endless number of meals, both on the grill and off. Take it one step farther, and it's about throwing get-togethers with friends and family centered around the grill.
- Eater

Give your backyard a warm welcome with Around the Fire, a beautiful book centered around cooking over fire from Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton of Ox in Portland.
- TastingTable

Whether you do most of your summertime cooking over a campfire, a charcoal kettle, or a gas grill, this debut cookbook from the team behind the Oregon restaurant, Ox, will supply plenty of creative, seasonal menu ideas and inspirational tips, all grounded in traditional, Latin American-style live fire cooking techniques.
- Real Simple

Everyone needs a cookbook to dream by. This book from the chefs/owners of Ox Restaurant in Portland, Ore., is mine this summer.
- Bill Daley, Chiacgo Tribune --This text refers to the hardcover edition.


Leaf Through

You can do a lot with a camping stove: make a bubbling fruit cobbler, foil-wrapped potatoes, kid-friendly banana boats. But the outdoors has bugs and temperamental weather, and even the best campfire falls short of a six-burner magnetic induction cooktop. Should you choose to venture outdoors, there are plenty of guides for that𠅏rom lazing on a (perfectly spread) picnic blanket to foraging safely𠅋ut we’re here today to show you how to cook like a camping pro while inside the comforts of your own kitchen.

Cooking Wild, by John Ash and James O. Fraioli (Running Press, $35)
These two James Beard Award-winning authors show you how to take foods from the wild and give them the domestic treatment. Ingredients range from familiar (maple syrup) to novel (candy cap mushrooms), but all are worth experimenting with. You’ll never know how good wild boar teriyaki meatballs are until you try them.

A Wilder Life, by Celestine Maddy and Abbye Churchill (Artisan, $30)
This book about “getting in touch with nature” comes from the founder of Wilder, a quarterly magazine that taps into the outdoor spirit. The pages extend past what goes on in the kitchen, like their field guide to butterflies or a primer on healing stones. But there are also plenty of staple recipes that you can (and should) make today, like tomato sauce, sauerkraut and kimchi.

The Picnic, by Marnie Hanel, Andrea Slonecker and Jen Stevenson (Artisan, $20)
For those who prefer hard proof over Instagram fodder, keep this book in your wicker basket for constant reference. There are ideas for breezy lawn games (to play while you digest tea-brined fried chicken), plus tips for how to deal with situations like iffy weather and ways to transport chilled food.

Around the Fire, by Greg Denton, Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Stacy Adimando (Ten Speed Press, $35)
The first from the chefs at Portland’s Ox is reminiscent of Francis Mallmann’s perennial favorite, Seven Fires, but the interlaced Oregon vibe gives it a refreshing edge. There are recipes for every season, showing that open-fire cooking doesn’t have to burn out when summer ends.

Camp Sunset, by Editors of Sunset Magazine (Oxmoor House, $25)
This guide is geared toward the “modern camper,” which, surprisingly, doesn’t mean glamping. It’s full of useful tips, like 𠇍o not think you are faster or smarter than a raccoon or bear,” as well as recipes for corn bread and apple crisp meant to be made over a campfire. There’s even a glow-in-the-dark constellation poster, should you need a reliable stargazing guide.

Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto, by Aaron Franklin and Jordan Mackay (Ten Speed Press, $30)
While people wait hours in line at this Austin barbecue spot, you can spend that time kicking back poolside as your smoker does the work on your very own brisket. It’s an all-around guide to grilling, so you can spend every day this summer mastering a new technique without fear of getting bored.

The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, by Pascal Baudar (Chelsea Green Publishing, $40)
More adventurous cooks will gravitate toward this foraging-forward book, which features recipes for pickled acorns, pine needle vinegar and more. Takeaway message for walking in the woods: Always look down.

Savor, by Ilona Oppenheim (Artisan, $30)
When Oppenheim needs a break from bustling Miami life, she takes her family and heads to a rustic Aspen cabin. This book gives you a glimpse into that open-air lifestyle, teaching you how to cook apples in hot coals and use red clover to make tea. Adorable photos of Oppenheim’s children eating wild harvested berries are an added bonus.

Feeding the Fire, by Joe Carroll and Nick Fauchald (Artisan, $30)
Brooklyn chef Carroll’s breezy grilling style is inspiration for exactly how barbecue should be enjoyed: with good company, beer and always outside. Get a leg up by supplementing your outdoor feast with his grilled Nutella-stracchino sandwich.

Project Smoke, by Steven Raichlen (Workman Publishing, $23)
Learn how to pick and use the smoker that best fits your needs, then try smoking any (and every) animal you can get your hands on. The 100-plus recipes prove that everything can be a smoke show, like nachos, capers and deviled eggs. There’s also dessert in the form of smoked chocolate bread pudding.


  • Editorial &rlm : &lrm Ten Speed Press (29 marzo 2016)
  • Idioma &rlm : &lrm Inglés
  • Pasta dura &rlm : &lrm 272 páginas
  • ISBN-10 &rlm : &lrm 1607747529
  • ISBN-13 &rlm : &lrm 978-1607747529
  • Dimensiones &rlm : &lrm 20.32 x 2.79 x 27.69 cm

Críticas

"One way we cooks show love is to feed and nourish people. Greg and Gabrielle's book is a true extension of this idea: it's about the passion that comes from cooking foods over fire, passion you can feel with each turn of the page. These recipes are approachable, yet bold with flavors that will sate you from deep within."
--Cortney Burns and Nick Balla, chefs and authors of Bar Tartine

This is the kind of food that expands our imagination of what can be cooked on the grill . It's a gorgeous book rarely has anyone captured the beauty of fire and food in the way photographer Evan Sung has. . Around the Fire takes the familiar, twists it a bit, and refreshes the whole category.
--Russ Parsons, Saveur

Every summer, grilling gets us out of our cold-weather cooking rut, and whether you're grinding morcilla sausage from scratch or simply firing up a steak for the first time, this cookbook will give your grilling new game.
- Epicurious

"Try Portland chefs Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton's inspired grilling recipes, particularly for vegetables, and slather their Black Gold, a basting sauce created by heating herbs and garlic in rendered animal fat, on everything."
- Cooking Light

Like the old teach a man to fish proverb, Around the Fire is designed to give you the tools to prepare an endless number of meals, both on the grill and off. Take it one step farther, and it's about throwing get-togethers with friends and family centered around the grill.
- Eater

Give your backyard a warm welcome with Around the Fire, a beautiful book centered around cooking over fire from Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton of Ox in Portland.
- TastingTable

Whether you do most of your summertime cooking over a campfire, a charcoal kettle, or a gas grill, this debut cookbook from the team behind the Oregon restaurant, Ox, will supply plenty of creative, seasonal menu ideas and inspirational tips, all grounded in traditional, Latin American-style live fire cooking techniques.
- Real Simple

Everyone needs a cookbook to dream by. This book from the chefs/owners of Ox Restaurant in Portland, Ore., is mine this summer.
- Bill Daley, Chiacgo Tribune

Biograf໚ del autor

STACY ADIMANDO is a food and travel journalist and cookbook author whose work has been published by NPR, Bon Appétit, Conde Nast Traveler, Food & Wine, Forbes, and many more. She lives in San Francisco.


5 Cookbooks That Wowed Us in 2016

Tom Philpott

In a kitchen rut? Try lobahashu, a walnut and kidney bean pâté from the Lori region of Armenia, from my favorite cookbook of the year, Naomi Duguid's Taste of Persia. Reproduced from Taste of Persia by Naomi Duguid (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2016. Photo by Gentl & Hyers

This year has been a rough one, characterized by political catastrophe and the deaths of great musicians: Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen, Sharon Jones, and more. One way I’ve coped is by cooking while listening to favorite songs from these fallen geniuses&mdashand a bumper crop of great cookbooks has been a great comfort. I began 2016 in a kitchen rut. For years, I’ve been focused on getting great seasonal ingredients and doing as little to them as possible&mdashand most of the cookbooks I’ve leaned on in recent years follow that solid but ultimately limiting strategy. My favorite cookbooks of 2016 are ones that shook me up, pushed me into new flavor palates and kitchen strategies. You can listen to me review my five favorites in this week’s episode of Bite podcast and read about them below.

&bull Taste of Persia: A Cook’s Travels Through Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, and Kurdistan, by Naomi Duguid

The intrepid Naomi Duguid has written a fantastic guide to a grand cuisine that is little known to US eaters, mainly because of the tortured history of the the US-Iran relationship. This one is personal for me, because way back in my college years, I lived for a while with Iranian housemates. The only way they could get a taste of home was to cook for themselves. The main thing I remember was their distinctive way with rice, which they intentionally overcooked to the point that it developed a golden-brown crust along the edges. They’d use this crisp outer layer like a flatbread, dipping it into spicy lamb or beef stews. Duguid’s book takes me straight back to that time&mdashshe delivers a foolproof recipe for that crusty rice, called chelo. And she also opens whole new vistas on a grand but neglected cuisine that sparkles with mint, parsley, pomegranate, rose petals, and spices like cinnamon and cardamom. On Thanksgiving, I cooked a dish&mdashrecipe here&mdashthat combined many of those elements into a gorgeous and delectable soup.

Great gift for: The committed home cook who has hit a rut anyone interested in learning more about Iran and its foodways
Killer dish: Pomegranate ash (soup) with lamb meatballs crusty Persian rice
Dish I’m dying to try: Purlsane soup

&bull All Under Heaven: Recipes From the 36 Cuisines of China, by Carolyn Phillips

Here is an ambitious take on a country whose cuisine is both ubiquitous and brutalized here in the United States. Carolyn Phillips is a veteran expert on Chinese cooking and creator of the blog Madame Huang’s Kitchen, which takes the last name of her husband, a Chinese national. This doorstop of a book divides the country into five regions. Each section obliterates the idea of a monolithic cuisine that draws its flavor from MSG and whose idea of a vegetable is a canned water chestnut. Many of the recipes are dead simple: “fried green onion noodles” could be whipped up on a Tuesday night without any special ingredients. Others, like Hangzou-style noodle soup, require a bit more prep&mdashand bamboo pith fungus. Generally, you’ll need access to a decent Chinese grocery, but mostly you’ll just have to seek out quality produce, meat, and fish. Despite its reputation here, Chinese cooking does not hide food under a cloak of heavy and cloying condiments. I’ve never been to China, but for me, All Under Heaven brings home the vibrant, vegetable-forward, umami-laced restaurant cooking I’ve found in places with large Chinese enclaves, like Manhattan’s Chinatown. For a deep dive into that storied area, check out this episode of Bite podcast.

Great gift for: Adventurous cooks looking for a deep deep into the vast universe of Chinese cookery
Killer dish: Fried green onion noodles
Dish I’m dying to try: Oyster/pork belly spring rolls

&bull A New Way to Dinner: A Playbook of Recipes and Strategies for the Week Ahead, by Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs

This is the magnum opus of the kitchen wizards behind the venerable website Food 52.It’s really two cookbooks: one chock-full of the kind of straight-ahead, irresistible stuff you find on Food 52, like fish filets coated with herbed mayo, gently roasted, and then broiled to develop a burnished top. Yum, right? But it’s also a kind of meta-cookbook offering a strategy that will be appreciated by many food-obsessed people (like me) who are tired of eating dinner at 10 p.m., and then facing a sink-full of dishes as midnight creeps in on a work night. In their scheme, you do all the menu planning, shopping, and most of the prepping over the weekend. You devote about three hours to the complicated, time-consuming stuff then, and whip out marvelous dinners during the week without much fuss or cleanup. No one who’s not already obsessed with regularly cooking top-notch home-cooked meals will ever do this&mdashit’s hard to compete with takeout and meal kits&mdashbut I love it. No more rushing to the grocery on Wednesday night to throw together an ultimately stress-inducing, messy meal.

Great gift for: Overcommitted people who refuse to compromise on great home-cooked meals
Killer dish: Low-maintenance fish tacos
Dish I’m dying to try: Chicken cutlets with chermoula and preserved lemon

&bull Home Cooked: Essential Recipes for a New Way to Cook, by Anya Fernald

Anya Fernald is a longtime expert on the flavors and culinary techniques of Italy, and runs a California pasture-based meat empire called Bel Campo. I opened the book half-expecting to be put off by Northern California sanctimony, but in the end I got sucked in by the sometimes-complicated and potently flavored dishes on offer. Like the Food 52 authors, Fernald urges readers to take a long view of cooking. Many of her dishes rely on what she calls “long cuts”&mdash”time-consuming base ingredients made when time and ingredients are abundant, then preserved to be used when they are needed.” She offers an impossibly rich, glorious, and relatively quick ragu&mdashquick, that is, for those who have bone broth, preserved tomatoes, and sofrito already on hand, all of which Frenald tells you how to do. That sofrito is the base of many dishes&mdashit’s just onions, carrots, and celery slow cooked in olive oil and blended into a burnt-orange paste with a flavor as deep as the roots of an old-growth tree. Fernald suggests making a big batch and then freezing it in ice cube trays, ready when you need it. A mere dollop makes her eggs poached in a quick sauce of grated fresh tomatoes into an easy weeknight triumph.

Great gift for: Overcommitted people who refuse to compromise on great home-cooked meals&mdashand dream of Italy
Killer dish: Eggs poached in tomato sauce
Dish I’m dying to try: Torta di verdure (a kind of savory pie stuffed with greens) beef cruda (an enticing, Italian take on tartare)

&bull Around the Fire: Recipes for Inspired Grilling and Seasonal Feasting From Ox Restaurant, by Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton

I’m normally allergic to cookbooks based on a single method of cooking. I’m also skeptical of chef-authored books, because they tend to presume limitless time and labor. So when I picked up this pretty tome, by the chef-owners of the famed open-fire restaurant Ox in Portland, I didn’t expect to be drawn in. I thought it might start with a recipe for constructing a vast restaurant-grade fire pit topped with a cast-iron grate&mdashand then harangue me to spend hours hunting down fancy cuts of firewood. But it turns out to have plenty of great ideas even for a backyard Weber-and-charcoal fellow like me. I never saw the point of grilled fish&mdashsautéing works so well&mdashbut their mackerel made a believer out of me. Along with flame-kissed mackerel steaks, you grill poblano chilies till they’re charred and then use them to make a smoky version of that great Spanish sauce, Romesco. Their meat preparations&mdashthink onion-marinated skirt steak with the delectable Argentine green sauce chimichurri&mdashare also top-notch. And since Ox is inspired by South American cooking, they also deliver great recipes for empanadas, as well as delectable and dead-easy ceviches that never touch a grill.

Great gift for: The grill obsessed, and the kitchen-bound cook who needs reminding of the glories of outdoor cooking
Killer dish: Onion-marinated skirt steak with the chimichurri
Dish I’m dying to try: Grilled artichokes with espelette mayo

Honorable mention: The veteran food writer Ronni Lundy has written a gorgeous ode to the cooking of Appalachia, called Victuals. Pronounced “vittles,” as the book’s cover makes clear, Victuals is equal parts cookbook and travelogue. It demonstrates that this stunningly beautiful, long-beleaguered region boasts a proud culinary heritage and an even richer food future. A traditional mountain dish called “killed lettuce”&mdashlettuce leaves tossed with chopped green onions and vinegar and then wilted with hot bacon grease&mdashexemplifies the hearty, resourceful cooking of the region.

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FEBRUARY

Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat

By Chrissy Teigen

Model/TV host/food blogger Chrissy Teigen isn't a chef, but the buzz on this book is intense. To wit: it's currently Amazon's #1 new release for Quick and Easy Cooking, and #3 for General Cookbooks. and it's not even out til the end of the month. Heck, an Instagram photo I took of the advanced reading copy—which didn't even have the final cover on it—got more likes than any other photo I posted in 2015.

But what's the book about, exactly? Honestly, it reads like your typical food blog-to-cookbook, if your typical food blogger were an international swimsuit model who's married to John Legend. Lots of recipes for weeknight meals and dinner parties, along with stories from her (admittedly atypical) life. Clarkson Potter: February 23

One Dough, Ten Breads: Making Great Bread by Hand

By Sarah Black

I'll admit it: bread can be a little intimidating. If you're serious about making bread at home, it involves keeping a starter alive, not to mention learning the fine art of proofing, kneading, and shaping. It's not the most intuitive process.

But baker Sarah Black walks you through it, step-by-step, starting with the simplest bread she can (a basic white loaf) and building on that in terms of flavor, texture, and shape. If you're looking for a book that will ease you into bread making (or a break from the super bro-y bread books of recent years) this is it. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: February 2

Koreatown: A Cookbook

By Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard

What happens to food when cultures collide? Delicious, delicious things. NYC chef Deuki Hong and writer (and Epicurious contributor) Matt Rodbard traveled to Koreatowns throughout the US to collect stories and recipes from those Korean-American communities.

A great book whether you're new to Korean food or looking for recipes for old favorites, Koreatown will have you running to your local Asian grocery to stock up on rice cakes, gochujang, and kimchi. (Or, better yet, making your own kimchi from scratch.) Recipes range from classics, to Hong and Rodbard's modern take on dishes, to recipes for chef interpretations. Clarkson Potter: February 16.

The United Tastes of Texas

By Jessica Dupuy

A little bit Southern, a little bit Mexican, and a whole lot of barbecue: Texas food is a unique (and delicious, and wildly popular) blend of cuisines all its own. Food writer Jessica Dupuy surveys the state from El Paso to Houston, Amarillo to the Rio Grande, in search of the best recipes it has to offer. Fajitas, queso, chili, cornbread and more are all here.

As a bonus, you'll pick up some history and culture along the way—including recommendations for chef profiles, road trip pit stops, and a primer on Texas barbecue—but I won't blame you if you flip straight to the pecan pie recipe. Oxmoor House: February 9

The Indian Family Kitchen

By Anjali Pathak

Cookbook author Anjali Pathak is the granddaughter of the founders of the Patak's brand of Indian ingredients, so she grew up surrounded by the flavors of India. But the subtitle of this book is "Classic Dishes for a New Generation": these are lightened, vegetable-forward dishes that reflect how we cook today.

Recipes include dishes like a spicy roasted squash stuffed with feta, mint, and sun-dried tomatoes, or Indian-spiced smoked ribs, or a roasted hazlenut and cardamom ice cream. The recipes in The Indian Family Kitchen aren't as simple as the ones in last fall's Made In India, but they are definitely a good place to start for someone looking to get into Indian cooking. Clarkson Potter: February 16

MORE GREAT BOOKS COMING IN FEBRUARY


3 Essential Grilling Cookbooks

Matt Taylor Gross

Nothing better. Matt Taylor Gross

My neighbor is a grill guy. He’s got a basic Weber kettle, of course. He’s got a gas grill, too, a barrel smoker, and a ceramic Big Green Egg that costs as much as my stove. He’s got a wood pellet—fired combination smoker-grill that costs way more. And he’s got a pizza oven that looks like a gleaming piece of Danish Modern statuary that I gave him because I couldn’t figure out how to put it together.

But with all those grills, he doesn’t have a single grill cookbook. And really, that’s not surprising. You can sum up the information necessary to be a good griller in about 20 pages, and just about every grill book does—in nearly the same words. Indeed, this lack of a need for detailed instruction is a big part of the attraction of grilling for a certain kind of cook. Grilling is the anti-baking: A live fire, meat, and seasoning is all you need to make a pretty delicious meal.

I’ve got a copy of one of the first popular grilling cookbooks, a 1938 edition of Sunset’s Barbecue Book. It’s spiral-bound and the cover is made from real wood (in a pinch, I suppose, you could use the cover for kindling). The first 50 pages are devoted to what is referred to as “barbe-construction”: Before you could buy a grill at every hardware store, you had to build one yourself. And as much as I love my trusty Weber, on warm evenings I do dream about a 17-foot brick barbecue constructed according to Sunset‘s plans, with height-adjustable grill, fireplace, oven, sink, and work surfaces (according to the included materials list, all I need is 2,000 “common bricks,” one and a half yards of mortar, and a lot of something called flue lining…perhaps I’d better get help).

Sunset’s Barbecue Book

Sunset’s Barbecue Book Matt Taylor Gross

There are maybe 15 pages of recipes (“barbe-cookery”), written by Virginia Rich (who went on to invent the genre of culinary mysteries). Especially considering the vintage, the dishes are quite respectable, such as barbecue oysters, an herb sauce for lamb, and grilled corn. I adapted the recipe for “Mexican beans”—a Central California regional classic of pinquito beans stewed with pork, beef, cumin, oregano, and sage—and it’s become one of my grilled dinner standbys.

Until recently, even though the number of grilling cookbooks has multiplied a thousandfold, they had not advanced in content much beyond Sunset. Like so many miners digging into a tapped-out vein, in most of them you’ll find essentially the same instructions for starting the coals, building a two-stage fire, and managing the temperature.

Seven Fires

Francis Mallman’s Seven Fires on Amazon Artisan

But over the past few years, grill books have come more closely to reflect the contemporary cookbook. They go more deeply into the subject, offer challenging new techniques, and even throw in a dash of romance. The spark was lit by Argentinian Francis Mallman with his 2009 Seven Fires (Artisan, $35), which gave full-color star-chef treatment to a grill cook. The trend is building. Two books published this spring exemplify the new state of the grill cookbook genre, and they couldn’t be more different. The first one is romantic, opening up new vistas for flame-kissed cooking. The other is technical, modern, no nonsense.

Around the Fire is from Portland’s Ox restaurant, which is run by the husband-and-wife team of Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton (who, perhaps not coincidentally, met working the grill at Terra restaurant in the Napa Valley). This is the kind of food that expands our imagination of what can be cooked on the grill, from maitake mushrooms to squab to lamb heart. It’s a gorgeous book rarely has anyone captured the beauty of fire and food in the way photographer Evan Sung has. Flipping through, you can almost hear the meats and vegetables spit and sizzle as they crisp.

Around the Fire

Ox’s Around the Fire on Amazon Matt Taylor Gross

The instruction is basic (fuel, basic tools, how to light a fire, indirect and direct heat, etc.) and the recipes are, by and large, fairly elemental. But where some cookbooks might fall back on old standards, Around the Fire takes the familiar, twists it a bit, and refreshes the whole category. Grilled artichokes are cooked whole, then split and seared over the fire before being served with a mayonnaise spiked with espelette pepper. They are meaty and good, and the slight floral burn from the espelette is perfect. Quail are brined in the whey left from making ricotta Dungeness crab is grilled and served with a smoked-tomato ancho chile butter whole spaghetti squash is roasted right on the coals before being served with toasted garlic-lemon oil and grated dried goat cheese.

Gabrielle Denton was raised in Argentina, and there’s a distinctly South American influence to much of the meat cookery. The Dentons are big fans of basting with what they call “Black Gold”—essentially, rendered meat drippings caught in the V-slat grooves of an Argentine-style grill and flavored with fresh herbs. Per their recommendations, I used a combination of bacon grease and butter in place of the drippings, and it tasted as ridiculously good as it sounds.

On the other end of the grill book spectrum is Meathead, the resolutely matter of fact, science-based take from Craig “Meathead” Goldwyn, whose website, amazingribs.com, attracted more than 8 million unique visitors last year. There’s nothing wrong with the recipes (though they’re decidedly old-school with names like “Big Bad Beef Rub,” “Last Meal Ribs,” and “Japanese Happy Mouth Yakitori Sauce”). But what makes this book truly fascinating is the instruction. Rather than a rote recitation of the same old advice, Goldwyn backs up his assertions with a decidedly modern, scientific approach.

Meathead

Meathead on Amazon Matt Taylor Gross

The how-to section is deep and well researched—almost 150 pages on the stuff you need to know before you start cooking—how to buy meat, freeze and reheat leftovers, and clean grill grates. Goldwyn is a competition barbecuer (there’s a lot of material on smoking in addition to grilling), and his writing voice is very much in that testosterone-fueled tradition. But the bluster shouldn’t obscure the fact that he’s done some challenging research, along with his science advisor Greg Blonder, an engineer and inventor with a doctorate in physics and a special interest in barbecue.

They offer revisionist takes on many grilling shibboleths, including resting cooked meat before carving, bringing meat to room temperature before cooking, and soaking wood chips for smoke (all unnecessary, they say). These are fascinating even if they are presented as more absolute than they might be in the real world. Goldwyn and Blonder find an “insignificant” loss of moisture when carving meat immediately without resting and prefer to have the meat delivered hot from the fire. Other cooks have done the exact same experiment and found that the amount of juice lost did matter and would prefer to let the meat settle. Still, if ever a grill book could be considered thought-provoking, this is the one.

Where Sunset’s Barbecue Book once served the DIY purpose of its time, today’s readers can look to Around the Fire and Meathead as two of this year’s great grilling guides, having advanced the techniques and expanded the possibilities for what we think a barbecue cookbook can be. It’s good to know there’s still some life left in the old genre after all.

Get the Recipes

Grilled Artichokes

Grilled artichokes over embers are delicious, and double as an aphrodisiac. Get the recipe for Grilled Oysters »

Around the Fire: Recipes for Inspired Grilling and Seasonal Feasting from Ox Restaurant [A Cookbook] (Hardcover)

One hundred innovative and exciting recipes for the backyard griller--inspired by the live-fire and asador cooking traditions of Latin America and the authors' popular restaurant, Ox, in Portland, Oregon.

Take your backyard barbecue game to the next level with Around the Fire, the highly anticipated debut cookbook from celebrated chefs Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton. These are black-belt grilling recipes&mdashinspired by the live-fire cooking traditions of Latin America, as well as the seasonal philosophy of their Portland, Oregon restaurant, Ox&mdashthat will change the way you think about and cook with fire. Featuring unexpected cuts of meat (like Grilled Lamb Shoulder Chops with Rosemary Marinade or Grilled Wild Halibut on the Bone with Toasted Garlic-Lemon Oil) seasonal produce (Grilled Butternut Squash with Za&rsquoatar and Charred Green Onion Yogurt will delight vegetarians and carnivores alike) and plenty of starters, salads, desserts, and drinks, Around the Fire will help make your next outdoor feast the stuff of legend.

&mdash Mother Jones Best Cookbooks of 2016

About the Author

GREG DENTON and GABRIELLE QUIÑÓNEZ DENTON are the chefs and owners of the critically acclaimed Ox Restaurant in Portland, Oregon. The James Beard Award finalists and Food & Wine best new chefs have earned rave reviews and legions of fans for their creative and edgy cooking.

STACY ADIMANDO is a food and travel journalist and cookbook author whose work has been published by NPR, Bon Appétit, Conde Nast Traveler, Food & Wine, Forbes, and many more. She lives in San Francisco.

Praise For&hellip

&ldquoWhen Greg and Gabrielle met over a wood-fired grill at Terra Restaurant in Napa Valley, the sparks flew, in more ways than one. Their terrific new book is sure to ignite your cooking passion as well. Their restaurant in Portland is called Ox, but this cookbook is not just about the meat: check out their chapter on grilled vegetables and you&rsquoll see what I mean.&rdquo 
&mdashNancy Silverton, chef and co-owner of the Mozza Restaurant Group

&ldquoOne way we cooks show love is to feed and nourish people. Greg and Gabrielle&rsquos book is a true extension of this idea: it&rsquos about the passion that comes from cooking foods over fire, passion you can feel with each turn of the page. These recipes are approachable, yet bold with flavors that will sate you from deep within.&rdquo 
&mdashCortney Burns and Nick Balla, chefs and authors of Bar Tartine

"This is the kind of food that expands our imagination of what can be cooked on the grill . It's a gorgeous book rarely has anyone captured the beauty of fire and food in the way photographer Evan Sung has. . Around the Fire takes the familiar, twists it a bit, and refreshes the whole category."
&mdashRuss Parsons, Saveur

"Every summer, grilling gets us out of our cold-weather cooking rut, and whether you&rsquore grinding morcilla sausage from scratch or simply firing up a steak for the first time, this cookbook will give your grilling new game."
&ndash Epicurious 

&ldquoTry Portland chefs Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton&rsquos inspired grilling recipes, particularly for vegetables, and slather their Black Gold, a basting sauce created by heating herbs and garlic in rendered animal fat, on everything.&rdquo
&ndash Cooking Light

"Like the old "teach a man to fish" proverb, Around the Fire is designed to give you the tools to prepare an endless number of meals, both on the grill and off. Take it one step farther, and it's about throwing get-togethers with friends and family centered around the grill."
&ndash Eater 

"Give your backyard a warm welcome with Around the Fire, a beautiful book centered around cooking over fire from Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton of Ox in Portland."
&ndash TastingTable

"Whether you do most of your summertime cooking over a campfire, a charcoal kettle, or a gas grill, this debut cookbook from the team behind the Oregon restaurant, Ox, will supply plenty of creative, seasonal menu ideas and inspirational tips, all grounded in traditional, Latin American-style live fire cooking techniques."
&ndash Real Simple

"Everyone needs a cookbook to dream by. This book from the chefs/owners of Ox Restaurant in Portland, Ore., is mine this summer."
&ndash Bill Daley, Chiacgo Tribune

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RESTAURANT COOKBOOKS

Ava Gene&rsquos

Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables by Joshua McFadden and Martha Holmberg
Andrea Damewood has written, "As anyone who has eaten a salad at Ava Gene&rsquos can attest, Josh McFadden is a vegetable whisperer. After years of rumors, his vegetable cookbook has come to fruition. McFadden divides the year into six seasons (summer gets three growing periods), and then splits it up according to vegetable. I&rsquove been spending time in the tomato section due to some epic home garden overplanting, and the platter of heirloom tomatoes with cucumber yogurt dressing and marinated chickpeas I took to a barbecue stole the show from the meat. A recipe for raw winter squash with brown butter, pecans, and currants is something I&rsquom banking on bringing me out of the winter blues, while the recipe for English peas with prosciutto and new potatoes already has me stoked for spring. McFadden&rsquos recipes aren&rsquot overly fussy, and provide a great peek into how his dishes incorporate texture, giving us normies a chance to steal his signature look." Try his cozy cabbage farro soup to warm up on a cold winter day.

Bar Norman

Wine Food: New Adventures in Drinking and Cooking by Dana Frank and Andrea Slonecker
The most fun way to learn about wine is definitely through drinking it, preferably paired with something delicious. This book from sommelier and Bar Norman owner Dana Frank and culinary creative director and stylist Andrea Slonecker will take you through the ins and outs of tasting wine and matching it with food (from pasta to your favorite takeout), along with 75 recipes for wine-friendly dishes like delicata squash and sausage crostata with ricotta and honey and slow-braised lamb ragu with rigatoni and whipped ricotta.


Cooking: Gwyneth Paltrow’s ‘It’s All Easy,’ and More

If dusting off the grill, dining al fresco and finally scoring a pint of tiny, jewel-like strawberries hasn’t gotten you pumped enough for warm-weather eating, this season’s cookbook lineup should seal the deal. Chefs, celebrities and the usual crop of vegetable evangelists weigh in with ideas for optimizing our spring awakenings, whether your idea of home cooking is preparing simple, fresh meals inspired by the local farmers’ market or experimenting with the regional cuisines of faraway kitchens. (P.S. Wherever you end up, be sure to get some cabbage. There will be kimchi.)

Anyone in need of a crash course on food that is Very Right Now will find it in IT’S ALL EASY: Delicious Weekday Recipes for the Super-Busy Home Cook (Goop Press /Grand Central, $35), by Gwyneth Paltrow with Thea Baumann. All the Instagram superstars are here — socca pizzas, açai bowls, avocado toasts, spiralized zucchini, ramen, cauliflower and kimchi “fried rice” — and they’re enlisted to help address the age-old dilemma: How do we find the time to prepare healthy, wholesome food for our families?

This is Paltrow’s third cookbook, but the first to be published by Goop, her lifestyle-website-turned-empire, where Baumann is the food editor. Unlike Paltrow’s last book, “It’s All Good,” which asked us to eschew all sorts of allergens and dietary evils (including tomatoes and yogurt), this one is grounded back on planet Earth. A good percentage of the recipes deliver on the fast part of the fast-and-fresh promise, and what makes them so appealing is the way Paltrow and Baumann elevate a simple dish without scaring anyone off.

Most of the time this is achieved with the addition of a hashtag-ready ingredient, like za’atar spices on the carrots or miso in the clam’s steaming broth. Sometimes it’s done with a twist on technique: Falafel is baked rather than fried a chicken won ton soup skips the fussy dumpling assembly, calling instead for noodles and ­ginger-and-scallion-spiked chicken meatballs. Whatever joke you want to make about an Oscar-winning actress weighing in on a you-and-me problem — too busy to cook — save it for after supper.

Also in the Instagram-ready category is THE LOVE & LEMONS COOKBOOK: An Apple-to-Zucchini Celebration of Impromptu Cooking (Avery, $35), by Jeanine Donofrio and her photographer husband, Jack Mathews, the Austin-based pair behind the book’s eponymous blog. You have to look pretty hard to find the moment where the author actually identifies the book as vegetarian, the assumption being that today’s evolved home cook, whether vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free or, to use Donofrio’s term, “meat-on-the-side-ian,” will be intrigued by plant-based meals and the prospect of experimenting with alternative ingredients to avoid animal products. (Chocolate mousse is made with avocados and almond milk a creamy fettuccine sauce with white miso paste and cashews.)

Anyone familiar with Donofrio’s blog knows her philosophy, and will feel right at home in the book’s bright, ­sunshine-flooded pages, where it seems as if happiness itself is tossed into every bowl of twirled asparagus shavings and seasonal salads. It’s very difficult to cook recipes like the coconut rice with brussels sprouts and the artichoke crostini with mint pesto and not make dramatic declarations along the lines of: Why don’t I eat like this every day? Donofrio will tell you that you can, as long as your pantry is stocked with the new basics (spelt flour, coconut oil, raw cashews) and as long as you have access to a farm market or a C.S.A. that will point you in the right direction if you just pay close enough attention. A new argument? No. One you’ll fall for anyway? Yes.

What if you want to eat like Donofrio every day, but no one else at your house does? VEGAN, VEGETARIAN, OMNIVORE: Dinner for Everyone at the Table (Norton, $35), by Anna Thomas, addresses the very real issue of catering to the increasingly disparate needs of whoever happens to be joining you for a meal. Unlike Donofrio’s carefully curated recipes, Thomas’s collection feels encyclopedic, reminiscent of Deborah Madison’s “The Greens Cookbook,” a reference that provides valuable advice for all seasons. Thomas’s “The Vegetarian Epicure,” published in 1972, was one of the first books to make the case that vegetarian food could be enjoyed as opposed to endured, and though, more than four decades later, we need no convincing on that front, she’s still hammering the point home with inspired recipes like sweet-and-sour glazed beets or smoky, spicy, limey tortilla soup with black beans and avocados.

But the agenda this time around is less romantic, more strategic: How to make one meal fit all. We’ve heard this promise before, but with 150 recipes and menu plans for holidays big and small, it’s not an empty one. In spite of the book’s breadth, Thomas doesn’t overthink things, and her solutions have the rare quality of being both obvious and brilliant. Easy fish soup begins as easy vegetable soup, with flaky fillets and shrimp added only in the last five minutes, after the vegans have been served. The recipe for a quinoa salad tossed with smoked Gouda, cranberries and walnuts suggests topping individual servings with caramelized sausage coins to satisfy the omnivores. A mezze spread for guests (in a section entitled “No One Eats Mezze Alone”) includes a plate of baked kibbe alongside the traditional spread of grilled vegetables, tabbouleh and muhammara. Nothing there is tweaked or adjusted, a kind of serving that’s ultimately Thomas’s most effective strategy — that is, start with foods the whole table loves without condition. “Everyone eats the watermelon at the picnic,” she writes in her introduction. “It’s not the vegan watermelon, it’s just the watermelon.”

Given our current food culture, where cross-sectioned cauliflower “steaks” seem to get more attention than the rib-eyes they’re imitating, it was only a matter of time before THE VEGETABLE BUTCHER: How to Select, Prep, Slice, Dice, and Masterfully Cook Vegetables From Artichokes to Zucchini (Workman, $29.95) came along. Its author, Cara Man­gini, who runs the restaurant Little Eater in Columbus, Ohio, hails from a long line of traditional Italian butchers but found her calling as “vegetable butcher” after working at Mario Batali’s Eataly in New York. In her ­information-jammed book, 10 years in the making, she wields her Japanese cleaver to chiffonade leafy greens and slices unsuspecting sunchokes into submission with a mandoline. She outlines selection and storage information, and itemizes what each vegetable’s ideal pairings might be. It’s not the sexiest of this spring’s crop, but for a certain kind of reader Mangini’s enthusiasm for the obscure and unsung can be addictive.

Ever found yourself at a late fall market intrigued by crosnes? (Pronounced “crones,” you might be happy to know.) Or stumped by yet another kohlrabi in your C.S.A. delivery box? Or wondering how to slice the base of a puntarelle into edible one-eighth-inch matchsticks? Mangini enlightens. There are conventional step-by-step recipes — all vegetarian — but her instructions for basic techniques (steaming, braising, roasting and so on) and “from the hip” recipe suggestions (without ingredient lists) are where the book’s value lies. Especially if your idea of a successful cookbook is one that teaches you lessons you can apply elsewhere, long after you’ve filed the book on the kitchen shelf.

There are two notable entries in the ever popular When Chefs Cook at Home category. Floyd Cardoz, the author, with Marah Stets, of FLAVORWALLA (Artisan, $29.95), sees it as his mission to introduce spice, dimension, heat and boldness into everything we cook in our family kitchens. Especially when those family kitchens include kids. Cardoz was nicknamed Spicy Man and Spice King in the various New York institutions where he worked the line and made his name (Lespinasse, Tabla, North End Grill), but the title he prefers is Flavorwalla. (The suffix “walla” in his native India indicates “expert.”)

Though there’s a subtle Indian accent to many of his dishes, Cardoz’s international influences are multiple, and his recipes run the gamut from throw-together-­after-work meals (stir-fried ground lamb and eggs shrimp curry with cauliflower) to more project-oriented showstoppers (an osso buco braised with warming spices killer pork carnitas with orange and chipotle that he developed for his El Verano taco stand at Citi Field). But it’s the tactical side of his chef brain that will resonate with the everyday home cook. When faced with feeding his two young sons, instead of caving to their preference for simple food, Cardoz decides to keep the protein bland and be adventurous with the flavoring of side dishes. (A straightforward sautéed spinach is boosted with ginger broccoli is pan-roasted and spiked with lime, honey and chile flakes corn is slathered with mayo and cotija cheese for his version of elote, a taqueria favorite.) He prizes efficiency, throwing tomorrow’s vegetables into the oven with tonight’s roast and swearing that the secret to fast weeknight meals is a gas grill (no pot to clean up) and a pressure-cooker, capable of yielding stews in under 30 minutes.

The 30-minute mandate isn’t a top priority for Claus Meyer, author of THE NORDIC KITCHEN: One Year of Family Cooking (Mitchell Beazley, $29.95), but he’s not apologizing. “The level of deliciousness” that these recipes represent “justifies the little bit of extra work,” he writes in his introduction. Though that “little bit of extra work” occasionally has you smoking homemade curd cheese, roughly a two-day project, to produce a single ingredient for a different recipe, you won’t mind once you sign on.

Shortcuts have never been the point for ­Meyer. The Danish food activist, perhaps best-known for cofounding Copenhagen’s Noma with René Redzepi, has set about redefining Nordic cuisine, believing that food is central to social change and to fixing his country’s lost connectedness with nature. (To New Yorkers, though, he’s probably better known for Grand Central Terminal’s new Nordic market.) Here he teaches us how to produce the smoky, pickled, intensely fresh flavors we now take for granted as Scandinavian signatures. Think raw salmon with lime, horseradish and garlic mustard lightly salted sea trout with cucumber and dill in (yes) smoked curd cheese dressing pan-fried mackerel with pickled tomatoes and rye bread toast.

Two new books aim to demystify Korean food for the American interested in exploring the cuisine beyond bibimbap. Both succeed, if in radically different ways. In KOREATOWN (Clarkson Potter, $30), Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard gain accessibility by staying firmly grounded as they eat their way through the Korean neighborhoods of major cities across the country, interviewing chefs and photographing the clientele. Recipes and dishes, shot in situ, are interspersed with stories from the everyday enthusiast. The overall effect? You don’t have to have grown up with an emo (literally, “auntie”) in order to create or appreciate authentic Korean food in your own home.

“We didn’t want to write a book narrated by a whispering woman dressed in silks,” the authors write, and in case that point isn’t made clear, Rodbard starts off with an essay called “How a White Boy Jew From Kalamazoo Fell Hard for Korean Food.” He’s a food writer who discovered his obsession by way of a 2012 guidebook assignment, and his enthusiasm might remind you of that friend from college who could persuade you to do anything, no matter how many midterms you had to study for.

Hong brings the kitchen chops, having studied at the Culinary Institute of America and worked with luminaries like Jean-Georges Vongerichten and David Chang. In spite of that pedigree, this book is about as un-chef-y a chef book as you can get. Sure, many of the recipes require a trip to the Asian specialty store to track down bean pastes and various sauces, but once you’re stocked, you’re set. A favorite, dubu jorim (soy-braised tofu), is written in only two steps crispy-chewy kimchi jeon (kimchi pancakes) blessedly calls for pre-made Korean pancake mix, since almost all Korean restaurants apparently use it too. It’s serendipitous when authenticity and simplicity overlap.

COOK KOREAN! A Comic Book With Recipes (Ten Speed, paper, $19.99 available in early July), by Robin Ha, comes at Korean food from a different angle — from, wait for it, that of a woman named Dengki, dressed in silks. (Or, more accurately, in a traditional Korean hanbok.) Dengki is this culinary comic book’s fictional heroine — gently reminding us to put on gloves before we mix our kimchi or discussing the finer points of anchovy broth. We learn in three quick panels that Ha had never been the beneficiary of this kind of methodical teaching. She was too busy drawing comics to figure out how her mom’s authentic cooking found its way to the table every night: “She just waved her hands and the food magically appeared.” As a young adult, absent a wand, Ha found herself broke in Brooklyn, a long subway ride from Manhattan’s Koreatown and missing her mother’s food, so she began cooking for her friends, writing and drawing what she made. Ta-da: “Cook Korean!”

Though Ha isn’t the first to experiment with the culinary comic book angle, she’s certainly among the first, and part of the fun here is watching her play around with conventions. Beyond the innovation of the approach, it’s also supremely practical. You can actually see the particular cut of beef you need or how to peel and cut a daikon radish or what the gochujang container looks like. (Anyone who has found herself in an H Mart aisle, staring blankly at the floor-to-ceiling tubs of pastes labeled only in Korean, knows the value in this service.) Besides, it’s hard not to laugh every time Ha employs the classic comic book device “Meanwhile” in loopy letters. You’re half expecting to see “Back at the Bat Cave” instead of “Let’s Make Ongsimi!” For that alone, her book earns its place on the kitchen shelf.

Cooks who value history and context as crucial ingredients in their recipes will treasure TASTING ROME: Fresh Flavors and Forgotten Recipes From an Ancient City (Clarkson Potter, $30), by Katie Parla and Kristina Gill. Both authors are American transplants in the Italian capital — Gill, a photographer and writer, arrived in 1999 Parla, a journalist and food historian, in 2003 — and one of the book’s many strengths is its ability to translate several thousand years of the city’s cuisine for today’s reader and home cook. Whatever you do, though, don’t mistake this book for one more love letter to the flour-­covered nonna making amatriciana and ­cacio e pepe in the corner trattoria. (Though both recipes are represented deliciously.) Parla and Gill include the romanticized dishes you’d expect, but the fun here lies in their exploration of the city’s less-trodden paths, both journalistically and ­gastronomically. “We enjoyed . . . breaking down the stereotype that Roman food must be hypertraditional in order to be authentic,” they write, delighting in updated versions of Roman comfort food standbys: Spaghetti with anchovies and butter is reimagined as crostini hand-held trapizzinos, a tramezzino and pizza mash-up, ­invented within the last decade, is Rome’s answer to pizza-by-the-slice.

The authors cover some major territory here, culling the best of Rome from peripheral neighborhoods and downloading kitchen wisdom from both the city’s more innovative restaurants and generations-old institutions. A third-generation norcino (pork butcher) walks us through porchetta the renowned restaurateur Arcangelo Dandini shares secrets for achieving light, pillowy gnocchi (the potatoes must be the driest available) and, in a fascinating chapter devoted to the culinary history of the Roman Jewish ghetto, the authors include a recipe for almond and cinnamon biscotti, sold by the “endearingly grumpy ladies” in a “crowded spartan bakery.” Making them in your American kitchen is never going to be exactly the same, but this takes you about as close as you’re going to get.

15 More Cookbooks

Don’t mind the heat and can’t bear to leave the kitchen? Here are 15 more cookbooks to try:

AN. To Eat: Recipes and Stories from a Vietnamese Family Kitchen. By Helen An and Jacqueline An. (Running Press, $35.) A blend of Vietnamese, French and California cuisine from the West Coast restaurateur and one of her five daughters.

AROUND THE FIRE: Recipes for Inspired Grilling and Seasonal Feasting From Ox Restaurant. By Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton with Stacy Adimando. (Ten Speed, $32.50.) Year-round, Latin-American-inspired grilling from the popular Portland, Ore., restaurant.

BROOKLYN RUSTIC: Simple Food for Sophisticated Palates. By Bryan Calvert with Tammy Walker. (Little, Brown, $30.) The chef behind James restaurant in Prospect Heights shares recipes from the hip borough’s “artisanal revolution.”

COOKING WITH LOULA: Greek Recipes From My Family to Yours. By Alexandra Stratou. (Artisan, $29.95.) An Athens-based chef pays homage to the cook who ruled her family’s kitchen and taught her the classics of Greek cuisine.

DIVA Q’S BARBECUE: 195 Recipes for Cooking with Family, Friends and Fire. By Danielle Bennett. (Appetite/Random House, paper, $24.95.) Casual backyard recipes from the host of the BBQ Crawl television show.

EATING IN THE MIDDLE: A Mostly Wholesome Cookbook. By Andie Mitchell (Clarkson Potter, $27.99.) Mitchell is best known for her memoir about her struggle with obesity, “It Was Me All Along.” Now she shares some of the recipes that helped her lose weight, and keep it off.

THE FARMETTE COOKBOOK: Recipes and Adventures From My Life on an Irish Farm. By Imen McDonnell. (Roost, $35.) Modern Irish recipes culled from the American food and lifestyle columnist’s popular blog, Farmette.

K-FOOD: Korean Home Cooking and Street Food. By Da-Hae and Gareth West. (Mitchell Beazley, $24.99.) A Korean chef and her British husband, founders of the street-food company Busan BBQ, use their recipes to blend Korean and Western flavors.

MALIBU FARM COOKBOOK: Recipes From the California Coast. By Helen Henderson. (Clarkson Potter, $40.) The Swedish-born chef at the popular Southern California restaurant — which now has outposts in Florida and Hawaii — celebrates fresh, organic local ingredients.

THE MIDDLE EASTERN VEGETARIAN COOKBOOK. By Salma Hage. (Phaidon, $39.95.) A culinary memoir with over 140 dishes, many of them vegan or gluten- free, from the author of “The Lebanese Kitchen.”

MY KITCHEN IN ROME: Recipes and Notes on Italian Cooking. By Rachel Roddy. (Grand Central Life & Style , $28.) A food blogger (Rachel Eats) and columnist (for The Guardian), Roddy is a Londoner who now makes her home in Italy.

THE PORTABLE FEAST: Creative Meals for Work and Play. By Jeanne Kelley. (Rizzoli, $35.) Clever suggestions for picnics, school or office lunches and meals al fresco from a longtime contributor to Bon Appétit and the food section of The Los Angeles Times.

SAVOR: Rustic Recipes Inspired by Forest, Field, and Farm. By Ilona Oppenheim (Artisan, $29.95.) The Swiss graphic designer and photographer, who now lives in Miami and Aspen, offers a lavishly illustrated collection of recipes for fresh, healthy eating.

SIROCCO: Fabulous Flavors From the Middle East. By Sabrina Ghayour. (Clarkson Potter, $30.)The popular host of Sabrina’s Kitchen, a supper club in London, continues the “culinary cultural blending” she began in “Persiana.”

THE WURST OF LUCKY PEACH: A Treasury of Encased Meat. By Chris Ying. (Clarkson Potter, $26.) A world tour of sausages, from the Balkans to Bavaria to deepest Queens.


Watch the video: The Frank Book Club. Hungry by Grace Dent. July 2021 (June 2022).